Retailers Need to Motivate Consumers to Shop In-Store… Stuff You Learned May Not Work On Teens, But This Might… We Love Seeing “Large Crowds”

Retailers Need to Motivate Consumers to Shop In-Store vs. Online

amazonThere are people in your humble e-newsletter editor’s home who need little more than a coupon or a sale and barely a gallon of gas in the tank of the family minivan to run to the local mall and, as they often say, “contribute to the local economy.” But according to a recent article by the Associated Press, there are some people who need more of a push to get out and shop. Besides a strong economy and low unemployment, what motivates people to get out and shop instead of going click-click-click or swipe-tap-tap? Some stores offer a faster shopping experience, whether with curbside pickup or self-checkout. Others offer exclusive product lines that aren’t even available online, perhaps even produced locally. “The department stores that have a clear strategy and vision are going to be the clear winners,” said Greg Petro, founder and CEO of First Insight, a retail consultant group.

The Stuff You Learned Above May not Work on Teens, but this Might

birkenstockYou may have a teen, or what the marketing world considers a “millennial,” sitting next to you right now that you’re trying to figure out. Loosely defined as people born between the mid-’90s and the early 2010s, they grew up on the ‘net and only know smartphones and social media (they’re the ones you turn to for help with your Facebook, Snapchat or Instagram, and then roll their eyes at you when you don’t get it). But they still need stuff. And sometimes they want it sooner than the next day. And they love the environment, so piles of cardboard boxes don’t necessarily please them. So how do you sell to them, or get them to even consider shopping in the mall? Eliza Brooke of Vox.com spoke to six high schoolers around the country about what they’re interested in buying right now and how they spend their money. “The way that teenagers shop now is totally different than before — brands and trends mostly gain steam over social media — and yet still very much the same.”

We Love Seeing “Large Crowds” and “Shopping Center Debuts” in a Headline

crowdKudos to Regency Centers, the folks behind the new $200 million Mellody Farm shopping center in Vernon Hills, just north of Chicago. It’s anchored by REI, Whole Foods, Nordstrom Rack, HomeGoods and Barnes & Noble and soon restaurants are expected to open up. Matt Hendy, a vice president with Regency Centers, which owns Mellody Farm, told the Chicago Tribune that little things like the décor and other modern touches offer visitors what he calls “Instagrammable moments” that can be shared with their social media friends. Artwork provided by Chicago artist Matthew Hoffman includes a “smile” mural on one building “and giant sculpture that spells out ‘all the best’ in the front park. A climbable sculpture “is eight feet tall and 23 feet long. It’s made of PVC pipes and recycled milk cartons fabricated to mimic wood,” Hoffman said.

ShoppingCenters.com’s RealSite™ Trade Areas

If you haven’t had the chance to check out our mobile device data-driven, RealSiteTM Trade Areas dataset for analyzing property boundaries and proximity studies, now’s the time! RealSiteTM, developed in partnership with UberMedia’s mobile location data and the geospatial expertise of B.I. Spatial, is our analysis and retail consumer activity-tracking product. With it, we can identify patronage patterns, determine likely residential locations, create polygon trade areas representing actual visitors to the center and analyze top consumer segmentation profiles. For more information, click here.

DMM e-News - Issue #144

issue 144

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